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Bad software limits human potential

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Creating things together is hard. Working together used to be simple and static, but is now complex and ever-changing. We all know how hard it is to utilise our full potential and effectively work towards a common goal. Rigid software built by someone else, adds to the problem and keeps us fixed in bad patterns.

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What if your tools were as flexible as your mind? Co-creation happens when collaboration is effortless and have impact. We use Multiply to build the tools and resources we need to be successful when working together. The only way to fulfill our full potential is to continously improve the way we work together.

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Sign up for Multiply right now to build the tools you need to solve your toughest problems. In the Multiply community, we help each other to achieve both individual and common goals. You play an important role co-creating the Multiply platform and community. Join us to explore humanity’s full potential.

Bad software limits human potential

Creating things together is hard

Working together used to be simple and static, but is now complex and ever-changing. We all know how hard it is to utilize our full potential and effectively work towards a common goal. Rigid software built by someone else, adds to the problem and keeps us fixed in bad patterns.

What if your tools were as flexible as your mind?

Co-creation happens when collaboration is effortless and has impact. You have surely experienced moments when flow happens in collaboration and work becomes magical. Our goal is to extend and multiply these moments.

We’re building something special and we can’t wait to share it with you. We’re in stealth mode right now, but sign up for the waitlist below to stay updated on our progress and be one of the first to experience our product when we launch. Join us to explore humanity’s full potential.

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At Multiply, we're all about team collaboration. We believe it's the key to unlocking creativity and productivity in the workplace. However, we also know that collaboration can be fraught with challenges. In this blog post, we'll explore some of the problems with collaboration, and offer some possible solutions. This post is based on expert advice from an interview I did with Phil Simon, author of the book Reimagining Collaboration.

What are some problems with collaboration?

According to Simon, contemporary collaboration plagues organizations. He cites a number of reasons:

•  People hate change, don't understand what a tool can do, or are unwilling to automate a manual business process. This is perhaps the most fundamental challenge with collaboration. People don't like to alter the way they work. What’s more, this resistance can make it difficult to get employees on board with new tools or processes.

•  The lack of awareness and training around how to use collaboration tools effectively. Many people simply don't know how to use collaboration tools effectively. Without proper training, employees will struggle to get the most out of these tools. Expecting workers to learn the ins and outs of different tools on their own time and dime is a fool’s errand.

•  Poor infrastructure: In many cases, companies don't invest in the right infrastructure or systems for collaboration. This can result in a patchwork of different tools that don't work well together.

•  Employees are often overwhelmed by the number of workplace technologies available and have difficulty finding basic documents. With so many workplace technologies available, it's no wonder that 41% of employees feel overwhelmed by the sheer number of options. This can make it difficult for people to find basic documents, let alone figure out how to use all these different tools effectively.

•  Logistical challenges with remote work: Remote work can add logistical challenges around coordinating with team members. Scheduling meetings, sharing files, and providing feedback can all be more difficult when team members are not in the same physical location.

The bottom line is that collaboration can be difficult, and there are a number of factors that contribute to this. For companies and teams that want to improve their collaboration, it's important to understand the root causes of these problems. By addressing the underlying issues, organizations can make collaboration much easier for their employees.

What are some possible solutions?

Phil Simon believes that solving these problems necessitates finding right tool for the job. It’s a key point in his book. Beyond that, organizations need to invest in proper training for employees. By doing this, companies can maximize the chances for success, and make collaboration much more effortless.

There are a few key things that companies can do to improve collaboration:

•  Find the right tool for the job: There is no one-size-fits-all solution when it comes to collaboration tools, but an internal collaboration hub is essential. Instead of using a patchwork of different tools, invest in one tool that can do everything you need it to. As Simon is fond of saying, embrace hubs and spokes.

•  Train employees: Employees need to be properly trained on how to use collaboration tools. Without this training, they will struggle to get the most out of these tools. Invest in proper training for your employees, and make sure they understand how to use the tools effectively.

•  Set up the right infrastructure: In order for collaboration to be successful, you need to have the right infrastructure in place. This includes investing in the right tool and ensuring that all employees have access to it. If you don't have the right infrastructure, the collaboration will be more difficult, and less effective.

Collaboration can be difficult, but it doesn't have to be. By understanding the root causes of these problems, and taking steps to address them, companies can set their teams up for success. At Multiply, we're passionate about team collaboration, and we believe it's key to unlocking creativity and productivity in the workplace. We hope this blog post has given you some insights into how you can improve collaboration within your own organization.

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What is flow?

The state of flow, also known as "the zone," is a mental state in which a person is completely absorbed in an activity and is able to achieve their fullest potential. When a person is in a state of flow, they are completely focused and engaged in what they are doing. Time seems to slow down or even stop, and they are able to access all of their skills and abilities. This state of complete absorption can lead to exceptional performance.

There are many different activities that can induce the state of flow, but it often occurs when we are engaged in an activity that we enjoy and that challenges us just enough so that we are not bored or overwhelmed. For example, some people experience flow while playing video games, others while painting or writing, and others while working on challenging problems.

What are the benefits of a flow state?

There have been numerous studies on the benefits of flow state, and the results show that it leads to improved performance across a wide range of activities. Some of the benefits include:

•  Increased productivity: In a study on software developers, those who were able to reach a Flow State reported being up to 500% more productive than usual.

•  Improved problem-solving ability: In a study of students taking an exam, those in a Flow State outperformed those who were not by up to 30%.

•  Increased creativity: A study of advertising professionals found that those in a Flow State were up to three times more creative than those who were not.

•  Improved focus and concentration: Numerous studies have shown that the state of flow leads to improved focus and concentration. One study found that people in a flow state could maintain their focus for up to six hours at a time.

What are the challenges with working remotely?

While there are many benefits to working remotely, there are also some challenges. One of the biggest challenges is maintaining focus and concentration. It can be difficult to stay on task when you're not in an office environment where there are other people around you holding you accountable. There are also distractions at home, such as family members, pets, or your favorite TV show playing in the background.

Another challenge with working remotely is feeling isolated from your team. When you're not physically present with your colleagues, it can be difficult to build relationships and feel like you're part of a team. This can lead to feelings of loneliness or isolation.

How to achieve a flow state when working remotely

You can do a few things to increase your chances of reaching a flow state when working remotely:

1. Set aside some uninterrupted time:

One of the best ways to reach a flow state is to set aside some uninterrupted time to work on your task. This means turning off all distractions, including your phone, email, and social media notifications. If you have children, this may mean hiring a babysitter or working during their nap time.

2. Find an environment that suits you:

It's important to find an environment that suits your needs in order to reach a flow state. For some people, this means working in complete silence, while others prefer background noise such as music or white noise. Experiment until you find what works best for you and stick with it.

3. Break down your task into smaller goals:

When you're feeling overwhelmed by a task, it can be helpful to break it down into smaller goals so that you don't feel like you're biting off more than you can chew. By accomplishing small goals along the way, you'll feel a sense of progress and momentum which can help push you through to the end goal.

4. Set a deadline:

Having a deadline for your task can help increase your sense of urgency and motivation. This doesn't mean that you have to finish the task in one sitting, but it does mean that you should start working on it sooner rather than later.

5. Get into the right mindset:

One of the most important things you can do to reach a flow state is to get into the right mindset. This means being positive and confident in your ability to complete the task at hand. If you're feeling doubtful or stressed, it will be more difficult to reach a flow state.

Conclusion

A flow state is an optimal mental state where we are able to achieve our fullest potential. While it can be challenging to reach this state when working remotely, there are some things we can do to increase our chances of success, such as setting aside uninterrupted time, finding an environment that suits us, breaking down our tasks into smaller goals, setting a deadline, and getting into the right mindset.

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Co-creation sounds positive, empowering, and innovative, and for some reason the word kind of feels right. We’re starting to hear about it here and there; from festivals and events to corporate customer engagement processes. But what is co-creation actually if we analyze it and break it down to its basic principles?

“Well, I do think there’s a good framework for thinking. It is physics. You know, the sort of first principles reasoning. Generally, I think there are — what I mean by that is, boil things down to their fundamental truths and reason up from there.”

Elon Musk on reasoning based on First Principles Thinking

Creation

Well, in order to define co-creation we must first define creation. And in order to define creation, it’s helpful first to describe what it’s not. Creation is not stressing through a tasklist that either you or someone else wrote, focusing on getting one thing done after another. Creation is not repeating something that I have done 100 times before on autopilot, barely paying attention to what I’m doing. Creation is not forcing myself to do things that I don’t want to do nor trying to be someone that I naturally am not.

Creation is when I come alive, daring to be myself while participating in what’s in front of me. Creation is when I bring my best qualities and skills, that superpower that we all have, to contribute to something more than just myself. Creation is when I feel that fear of being too much or too different or not fitting in, but still allow myself to act in flow and trust my instinct to talk, move or express my chosen craft to let something new come alive. If I am painting, I’m very aware of how the colors are set on the canvas in real time. If I am pitching an idea, I’m aware of who I am speaking to and responding to his or her signals, questions, and input.

A Universal Principle

Creation is not only for the so-called “creative class”. It’s a universal principle, a state of being, that we can all access whether we are writing, painting, coding, building a house, taking care of children, or doing administration. Creation is not even limited to living entities, a company, government, or country can even be in creation - which we have seen proof of many many times during history.

Co-creation

If you hold back your suggestions because you think the people you work with will respond negatively, beware that you might only project your own attachments on them. Go out on a limb to suggest changes even though they might interfere with what other people have in mind. Your co-creators might be more likely to appreciate your contributions if you don't treat them as if you need to protect their feelings.

Co-creation is when my goals, your goals, and our goals align. When we are smarter together than separately. Where we can reach more of our individual potential by creating together. And most significantly, where we are both in a state of creation together. This is the hard part.

Creating things together is hard. But this is the challenge that we have chosen and continue to explore through Multiply.

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In order for cocreation to happen, we need to let go of our expectations, our need to look good in front of others, and our attachment to the results of our efforts. Our egos often get in the way of co-creation because we are too focused on our own ideas and desires. Read this post to get ideas for how to co-create more efficiently with better results.

In the past, when I was the CEO of Twingly, there was a salesperson that wrote great emails and sales copy, but sometimes struggled to know if the end result was good enough. We knew each other well, having mutual confidence in being familiar with each other's strengths and mindsets. I knew from the bottom of my heart that whenever she handed me a text for editing, she had 100% trust in that whatever changes I made were sound and elevated the end result. This allowed me to cut, rearrange and improve her texts without any ego getting in the way, on either side. Our workflow was fast and efficient and the result was always better than either of us could have achieved on our own.

Co-creation only works if we let go of our attachment to the results. We need to be open to others' ideas and focus on the process, not the outcome. When we enjoy the journey, the destination is secondary.

What is ego in this case? Ego is our attachment to our own ideas and desires. It's our need to look good in front of others, and our need to be right. It's the voice in our head that tells us we need to do everything ourselves, and that we can't rely on anyone else.

"Let go" are two words easy to say, but they can be extremely difficult to put into practice.

So, how do we let go of our ego? Here are some ideas:

1. Know yourself.

Notice the physical sensation you get in your body when attaching yourself to a certain outcome. Is there warmth in your chest when you feel like your contributions are not valued, or when you realize they might not have the prominent place in the end result of collaborative efforts as you would have wished? Do you tense up, raising shoulders or closing fists? Use the awareness of your physical response to remind yourself that it's a good time to let go and detach.

2. Don't take things personally.

This is a hard one, but it's so important. When we're attached to the results, we take things personally. We take criticism personally, and we take compliments personally. We need to remember that it's not about us; it's about the task at hand. We need to let go of our ego and remember that we're working towards a common goal.

3. Trust your co-creators.

If you hold back your suggestions because you think the people you work with will respond negatively, beware that you might only project your own attachments on them. Go out on a limb to suggest changes even though they might interfere with what other people have in mind. Your co-creators might be more likely to appreciate your contributions if you don't treat them as if you need to protect their feelings.

4. Practice and express gratitude.

A great way to let go of your ego is to practice gratitude. Be grateful for the opportunity to co-create. Be grateful for the people you're working with. Be grateful for the journey. When we're grateful, we're not focused on ourselves. We're focused on the good that's happening around us. Gratitude is a great way to let go of our ego.

5. Don't take yourself too seriously.

When we take ourselves too seriously, we're not open to others' ideas. We're not open to feedback. We're not open to the process. We're so focused on the outcome that we're not enjoying the journey. So, don't take yourself too seriously. Enjoy the process, and the results will take care of themselves.

In summary, ego can get in the way of co-creation because we're too focused on our own ideas and desires. If we want to overcome this, we need to let go of our attachment to the results and be open to others' ideas. We also need to focus on the process, not the outcome. When we do this, we can enjoy the journey and the results will take care of themselves.

For further reading on the topic of letting go, I warmly recommend the website Life Without a Centre which contains the writings of Jeff Foster.

And for a light-hearted approach to the topic, I recommend the book Ego is the Enemy by Ryan Holiday.

2 persons watching stars at night
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What we believe

We believe that human potential is essentially unlimited. Working together as a community we explore the extent of where humanity can go. As an individual, I can actualize my own full potential. Together we can create something bigger, better, and more beautiful than we ever could alone.

Multiplying our individual potential by empowering co-creation

We believe that when people and entities can pursue their own goals and common goals at the same time, magic happens. Multiply’s purpose is to empower humanity to explore its full collective potential - by allowing us to actualize and multiply our individual potential through co-creation.

A world of unlimited human potential

We envision a world where people actualize their own potential as part of their daily work. A world where organizations and societies can easily share knowledge, co-create and evolve. A world where we utilize our full collective intelligence and everyone is participating in co-creating a better future.

2 persons spending time actively together
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Everything and everyone is connected

The world has more information, is more interconnected, and is changing faster than ever before. The strict borders of organizations are disappearing, with new types of structures for collaborations emerging. Together every company, team, and individual now plays a part in this complex web of value-creation that is the new Network Economy.

Working together used to be simple and static, but is now complex and ever-changing. Yet, collaboration across company borders, networks, society, and tools is still often hard, time-consuming, and full of friction.

It’s time for frictionless co-creation across company borders, networks and society

The world craves new models that make the complex simple and the simple effortless. Every individual should be able to find their part to play and their way to work in this new network economy. Organizations need the infrastructure to become both self-improving and self-actualizing, evolving their own processes and culture for sustainability. The world needs communities to become more intelligent and collective action to be both simple and mutually beneficial.

Creating things together is hard

We all know the difficulty of working together effectively towards a common goal. So many different factors play a role: communication, trust, leadership, stress, etc. It is often hard to find a way of working where we both reach our goals and allow everyone to thrive. Rigid software built by someone else, adds to the problem and keeps us fixed in bad patterns.

Co-creation should be effortless

Co-creation happens when collaboration is effortless and has an impact. When we come together and co-create as a team and as a community, we can build beautiful and amazing things.

2 persons driving a motorcycle together
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Everything and everyone is connected

Our civilization was built on production, on building. Our forefathers and foremothers built roads and trains, farms and factories, then the computer, the microchip, the smartphone, and uncounted thousands of other things that we now take for granted, that are all around us, that define our lives and provide for our well-being. There is only one way to honor their legacy and to create the future we want for our own children and grandchildren, and that’s to build.

Marc Andreessen

Co-creation is building, together

It’s time to co-create, to build together. To build what we are most passionate about, but integrate with and empower each other across company and societal borders.

The strict borders of organizations and societies are disappearing, with new types of structures for collaborations emerging. Together we now each play a part in a complex web of value-creation in this new network economy.

Our invitation

We invite you to join us on this journey, taking part in creating a new world of radically productive and effortless co-creation. A world to help all of us reach our full potential and multiply the impact of every team we’re part of. A platform where each and every one of us has something truly unique to contribute.

If you want to take us up on this invitation, the first simple step is to sign up right away on multiply.co.

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